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Presto

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Part 1
SuperCoach: Traded players worth considering for your team in 2019
Kate Salemme, Herald Sun
39 minutes ago
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AFL players move clubs for a variety of reasons but often the search for more senior opportunities is the most common, which is good news for SuperCoaches.
During the October trade and free agency period, 42 players swapped clubs which means there are plenty of options out there for us to find some value and players who have the ability to become integral parts of our teams next year.
Devon Smith is the prime example. He was traded from GWS to Essendon at the end of 2017 because he wanted to spend more time in the midfield.
He was granted that opportunity in his first season with the Bombers and quickly became a set and forget player in most SuperCoach forward lines, averaging 97.9 points per game — ranked No.7 for forwards.
Who will be the Devon Smith of 2019?
While Dayne Beams, Dylan Shiel and Tom Lynch were the most high-profile movers, it’s often in the lesser lights that SuperCoach gold is found.
Look at the likes of Anthony Miles (Richmond to Gold Coast), Will Setterfield (GWS to Carlton), Nic Newman (Sydney to Carlton) and even Aaron Hall (Gold Coast to North Melbourne) — each of those players have moved clubs looking for more senior opportunities, which means they should be on our SuperCoach radar.
But they’re not the only ones.
Here are the traded players worth considering for your SuperCoach team in 2019.
COREY ELLIS (GOLD COAST) $233,300 DEF/MID
In theory Gold Coast should provide us with plenty of SuperCoach gold next year given they’ll be forced to trial a number of young players and former Tiger Ellis will be one of those. He’s a good ball user and should be given plenty of opportunity to cement his spot across halfback or on the wing at the Suns. The only issue is his price tag — at $233,300 he’s more expensive than we hoped given he played only four games in 2018 for a career total of 27 in four seasons. His dual position status is a big tick but he might be one to watch over pre-season rather than locking him into your side for Round 1 at this stage.
SAM COLLINS (GOLD COAST) $188,900 DEF
Collins technically isn’t a traded player but he was a pre-listed selection by the Suns out of the VFL so we thought we’d include him. He should slot into a key defensive post following the departure of Steven May to Melbourne, with his intercept marking a feature of his game. At just $188,900 he’s too good to pass up. If fit, he should play 22 games in 2019.
NIC NEWMAN (CARLTON) $394,100 DEF
The second ACL injury to Sam Docherty makes the acquisition of Newman a smart one. The former Swan can fill the Docherty role across halfback, with his speed and ball use key features of his game. The Blues play a high-possession brand of footy and that should mean good things for Newman’s disposal numbers given he’s the type of player who can set up play across halfback and use his skill to create. He averaged 82.7 SuperCoach points per game in 2017 before 72.6 last year. He’s awkwardly priced but there’s definite upside here if you’re willing to take the risk.
LACHIE NEALE (BRISBANE LIONS) $607,300 MID
Neale isn’t the cheapest option but it’s impossible to ignore his SuperCoach record. He’s averaged 109 points or more per game in his last three seasons and last year had the 11th-best average of any player (111.9). He will step into the Lions midfield and probably be the No.1 man, a role he has relished in the past, when former teammate Nat Fyfe was injured. At $607,300 he’s a cheaper alternative to the likes of Tom Mitchell, Patrick Cripps and Clayton Oliver and is a proven performer. Neale was ranked top five in the AFL in 2018 for total disposals (30.3 per game) and clearances (7.1 per game) and top six for contested possessions (15 per game) and centre clearances (2.8 per game). He’s also extremely durable, having played 21 or more games in his past five seasons, so you can pick him with confidence.
 

Presto

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Part 2
DAYNE BEAMS (COLLINGWOOD) $557,600 MID
Collingwood’s star-studded midfield got even stronger during the trade period with the addition of Beams but just how he fits in alongside he likes of Pendlebury, Treloar, Sidebottom and Adams remains to be seen. What we do know is Beams has averaged 122.9 points per game before — back in 2012 with the Magpies — as well as season averages of 115.5 (2014) and 113.4 (2015). It will be impossible for opposition clubs to restrict all of Collingwood’s gun midfielders and Beams could be the one that gets off the chain given his ability to push forward and kick goals — an aspect the Magpies have lacked from their midfielders. With the likes of Tom Mitchell, Dustin Martin, Jack Macrae, Nat Fyfe and Josh Kelly likely to be more popular premium picks in the midfield, Beams could be a nice point of difference.
DYLAN SHIEL (ESSENDON) $487,000 MID
Essendon’s new gun midfielder has always threatened to be a SuperCoach star, hovering at an average between 94-103 between 2014-17 before dropping back to 89.7 in 2018. Is 2019 the year Shiel finally explodes and gets up to that 110+ average we’ve been waiting for? His price is very tempting but he’s probably more a wait and see option.
AARON HALL (NORTH MELBOURNE) $389,200 MID
SuperCoaches have a love-hate relationship with the former Sun. At his best he’s a line-breaking midfielder who can kick goals but the gap between his best and worst is too great. He’s had his injury problems but when fit we’ve seen him average 95.5 and 92.3 points per game while playing in a poor side. Is the change of scenery exactly what he needs? Hall is one for the SuperCoaches who love a high risk/high reward mid-pricer. His midfield only status will hurt his ownership numbers.
SAM LLOYD (WESTERN BULLDOGS) $386,000 MID
When Lloyd found his way from Richmond to Western Bulldogs during the trade period the immediate thought was he should be SuperCoach gold but his high price tag and midfield-only status means he’ll be overlooked by most. He averaged 79 points in seven games in 2018 — the best average of his career — but we can’t pick him with any confidence.
ANTHONY MILES (GOLD COAST) $342,000 MID
Miles will be a very popular choice in 2019. While he’s a mid-pricer at $342,000 his potential is far too good to ignore given he’s averaged 98.9 points or more in three seasons, including a personal best of 99.9 in 2014. He’s a ball magnet, works hard and wins his own footy, which he’ll need to do when playing in an inexperienced Gold Coast midfield. He should make us money and be a nice stepping stone to a premium.
DAN HANNEBERY (ST KILDA) $326,100 MID
Hannebery has had his injury problems over the last two seasons, which has season his output fall under the level we’ve come to expect from him but at his best, he’s a damaging midfielder who can be that star the Saints are looking for. The former Swan is confident his body will stand up and at $326,100 he’s a prospect far too good to overlook quickly. He averaged 113.4 in 2016 and 114.5 in 2015, while even his 97.3 average of 2017 would see his price rise sharply for us if he can find anywhere near that form. He’s one to watch over the pre-season to see how his body is tracking. He could be one of the bargains of the year.
GEORGE HORLIN-SMITH (GOLD COAST) $270,300 MID
The former Cat is another who has joined Gold Coast looking for more senior opportunities after playing just 51 games in seven seasons at Geelong. He’s never been a big SuperCoach scorer, with most of his season averages hovering in the 60s and below but his 75.7 average in 2017 is intriguing. The downside is he’s not a rookie price — at $270,300 it’s more than we’d want to spend on a player who, on exposed form, might not make us the kind of money we’re looking for. He’s another to watch over pre-season before making a call either way.
 

Presto

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Part 3
CHAD WINGARD (HAWTHORN) $481,100 FWD/MID
Wingard is an elite talent but he’s never really become the SuperCoach star we expected him to become after his breakout season in 2013 when he averaged 98.6 points per game. He’s averaged over 90 points three times in his career — in 2013, 2015 (97.8) and 2017 (93.0) — while he’s twice averaged 80 or more (2016 and 2018). Can he find that next level at Hawthorn? We know the Hawks have a history of targeting players from rival clubs and turning them into stars and Wingard could be the next player in a long list of success stories. He’s definitely one to consider strongly. The change of scenery and working under master coach Alastair Clarkson could be just what he needs to find that next level.
LUKE DAHLHAUS (GEELONG) $418,300 FWD/MID
Dahlhaus is hoping to reignite his career at Geelong after a disappointing season. At his best he’s one of the best small forwards/midfielders in the competition because he’s a pressure player with good skills who kicks goals — all aspects that equal SuperCoach success. He averaged a career-high 104.5 points per game in 2015 before 95.7 in the premiership year of 2016, before dropping back to 90.7 in 2017 and 77.1 this year — the second-lowest average of his career. At $418,300 the former Bulldog presents some serious value given we know he can average between 90-105 and should slot in well alongside the likes of Dangerfield, Selwood, Ablett and Hawkins.
WILL SETTERFIELD (CARLTON) $144,900 FWD/MID
He’s coming off a knee reconstruction but new Blue Setterfield should be one of the first picked in your team — probably on the bench at this stage as you track his progress over the remainder of the pre-season. At just $144,900 and with dual position status, he’s an easy pick given he’s already done a couple of pre-seasons and isn’t a draftee coming in fresh. Setterfield is a highly-rated youngster who should get plenty of opportunities to shine, if fit, in the Carlton midfield in 2019. Lock him in.
TOM LYNCH (RICHMOND) $425,600 FWD
The former Suns co-captain will partner Jack Riewoldt in a new-look Richmond forward line next season but just how that impacts the SuperCoach scores of both players remains to be seen. Lynch averaged a career-best 93.2 points per game in 2016 and has averaged more than 80 points per game three times — in 2014, 2015 and 2017 — despite playing in a poor side. So how good can he be playing for the premiership favourites? The Lynch-Riewoldt partnership might take some getting used to, so monitor his scores over the pre-season. At this stage he’s a no given he’s priced awkwardly.
 

Darkie

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#4
Thanks for posting Presto, a good read.

Worth flagging that the Miles stats are not correct. A good reminder to check for yourself before you lock someone in!
 

Presto

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The forgotten men of SuperCoach who could be steals in 2019
Al Paton, Herald Sun
December 18, 2018 10:07am
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A four-time premiership defender who costs less than this year’s No.1 draft pick? Yes, please.
A midfield gun who has averaged 96 points a game, a forward who twice led Collingwood’s goalkicking and a running backman who once scored 120-plus six times in a season are among the potential bargains on the table for SuperCoach next season.
These players have dropped off the radar after extended layoffs but all have a proven history of scoring in SuperCoach and could be steals if they return to their best in 2019.
Returning to the field at all is the first step, but the signs are good early in the pre-season.
Which of these forgotten men will be in your starting squad?

Grant Birchall (Hawthorn) $205,200 defender

The 245-game veteran last played in Round 15, 2017 before a series of knee setbacks ruined his next season-and-a-half. But he’s back on the training track and the Hawks have tailored a program to have him ready for Round 1.

“If we had beaten Melbourne in that final, the plan was to play half a game in the twos that weekend, then try and get back for West Coast the week after, but it didn’t eventuate,” he told the Hawks website of an aborted plan for a late 2018 comeback.

Birchall averaged 22 disposals a game across his first 11 full seasons and at least 84 SuperCoach points a game from 2011-16.

He will be 31 in January, but did we mention he’s cheaper than teenager Sam Walsh, who is yet to play an AFL game? If Birchall is fit he has to be in your side.

Liam Picken (Western Bulldogs) $285,500 forward

There were serious questions over Picken’s playing future after heavy head knocks left him with dizzy spells and headaches, causing doctors to call off his 2018 season early. But the Dogs received a pre-season boost when Picken returned to the training track in November.

The club is taking a cautious approach so don’t pencil him in for Round 1 yet, but if he can get back to the form that saw him average 99 points a game in 2015 and 86 in the Dogs’ premiership year, he’ll be a great buy at that price.

Brad Crouch (Adelaide) $418,000 midfielder

Crouch is a long-time SuperCoach tease, tempting us to pick him ever since he delivered five 100-plus scores in his debut season. His career since then has been a succession of injury problems, missing all of 2018 with groin problems.

But he’s back, impressing teammates at pre-season training who no doubt remember the past four games he played in 2017 — Round 23, the qualifying, preliminary and Grand Finals — that included a 42-disposal game against West Coast, 29 touches and seven tackles against Richmond in the big one and a total of 30 tackles over those four weeks.

A finally fit Crouch could be a game-changer for the Crows, and SuperCoach.

Brodie Smith (Adelaide) $332,500 defender

Sticking in Adelaide, Smith is another who has been largely forgotten by the footy world after suffering a knee injury during the Crows’ qualifying final win against GWS in 2017.

He made a return late last season when the Crows’ season was already done and dusted and many fans weren’t paying attention — but we should have been.

After a low-key comeback in Round 20, he turned it on the next week against the Giants with 29 disposals, six marks and 129 SuperCoach points.

More of that in 2019, please.

Jamie Elliott (Coll) $280,300 forward

A goalkicker capable of booting 30-plus goals in a season four years in a row would have been handy for the Magpies on Grand Final day. And he could be a bargain in SuperCoach next year.

Elliott appears to have overcome the ankle and hamstring problems that derailed his 2018 season. The question is can he find a spot in a multi-pronged Magpie forward line?

If he can, expect SuperCoach scores in the 75-85 range — not enough to be a keeper but good for an early cash rise, especially if he can land a bag of three or four goals against the Blues (Round 8) or Saints (Round 9).

Dylan Roberton (St Kilda) $297,500 defender

The footy world was in shock when Roberton collapsed in the middle of GMHBA Stadium back in Round 4 last season. “I remember going really dizzy and that’s about it,” Roberton told the Herald Sun in August. “The next thing I saw the physios and they were sort of saying ‘stay down’.”

After a series of tests, and surgery to insert a device the size of a pen lid to monitor his heart, Roberton has returned for the start of pre-season training, putting in an impressive time in the Saints’ time-trial as he builds towards a return in 2019.

The Saints defender was a surprise packet in 2017, averaging 93 points a game. Watch his role, and his fitness, leading into next season.

Josh Bruce (St Kilda) $268,500 forward

Now we’re in territory of players who don’t necessarily have the scoring pedigree of the names listed above, but demand consideration based on super-low starting prices.

Bruce is priced at about a 50-point average but even in the three games he managed in a 2017 season ruined by back problems he averaged 71 and the year before he posted four scores above 90. You just need two of those in a row for a price spike before cashing him in.

Josh Bruce is determined to win back his spot in St Kilda’s best 22.

Darcy Moore (Collingwood) $239,400 defender/forward

Moore is even cheaper than Bruce and he scored 91 points against Richmond in Round 19 last year. His problem was staying on the field, with several appearances ending early due to injury. But the Pies have re-signed him and the potential is there. Will you take the risk?

Daniel Wells (Collingwood) $302,900 forward

SuperCoach players will have fond memories of Wells’ 2016 season, when he started at a bargain price and went on to average more than 100 points a game — setting the template for what he dream of from these forgotten SuperCoach stars.

Can history repeat in 2019? After that season he moved to Collingwood but his injury problems returned, restricting him to just 14 games in two seasons.

What’s his body like right now? Who knows. He seems to have vanished from the AFL radar but he is still on the list and has a year to play on his contract.

“He wants to play and he will be able to play - of course he will,” Wells’ manager Liam Pickering told SEN radio in July.

“He’s contracted and he’ll be playing ... he gets his foot right, he still has his speed and he’s still got his class. Let’s not forget the games he played last year, how important he was. He’s just had a bad run the last 12 months.”
 

Presto

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SuperCoach Cheapie Bible: All the rookies you need to know for 2019

Al Paton and Kate Salemme, Herald Sun

an hour ago

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SuperCoach players, it’s time to party like it’s 2011-12.

In those early days of the Gold Coast Suns and GWS Giants we stuffed our squads with cheap kids we knew would get game time, and mature-age recruits ready to make the most of a shot at the big time.

With the Suns embarking on an ambitious list overhaul and an apparent competition-wide search for the next Tim Kelly, 2019 playing lists present potential rookie riches not seen since those glory days.

Cheapies — players priced at under $200,000 — are the key to a successful SuperCoach team.

Not only do they help you put a squad together under the $10 million salary cap, they help your SuperCoach team grow in overall price during the season, allowing you to upgrade starting players with low prices into premium players who pump out big scores every week.

The key is to find players who will get games early in the season, so role and opportunity play a big role in the search for a successful rookie SuperCoach pick.

Pre-season matches will provide an insight into how teams might look when the season kicks off, but if you can’t wait until then here is an early take on the cheapies who should be part of our SuperCoach plans.

Check back for regular updates of this article as we get more insights over the pre-season.

DEFENDERS

Tom Williamson (Carlton) $189,500

Williamson’s 2018 season was ruined by injury, a major blow given he is very highly rated at the Blues. He’s a smooth-moving halfback and with Sam Docherty suffering another ACL tear, some believe Williamson will be the man to fill the void. He played 15 senior games in 2017 and averaged only 49.9 SuperCoach points but will another pre-season under his belt and time in the gym, he should be better equipped for senior footy. The Blues play a high-possession style, which could mean very good things. Watch him over the pre-season.

Connor Rozee (Port Adelaide) $189,300 def/fwd

The No.5 draft pick is lightly-framed but the Power are looking to inject more speed into the midfield following the loss of Jared Polec and Chad Wingard, and Rozee brings just that. He’s had experience playing against senior bodies in the SANFL, which will hold him in good stead as he pushes for a Round 1 debut. He’s also known for his tackling and aggression, two characteristics that should see him in the selection mix. Has played both midfield (157 SuperCoach-point average in 2016 under-16 championships and 104 points in 2017) and forward (74-point SuperCoach average at under-18 carnival), so watch his role over pre-season before making a decision. Still, if he can average 74 points at AFL level you’d take that as a nice cash cow injection.

Sam Collins (Gold Coast) $188,900

During his first stint in the AFL Collins put up some good scores for Fremantle in 2016-17 (including a 126 against Collingwood) before being delisted by the Dockers after just 14 matches. The 24-year-old gets another chance, this time at the Suns, after an outstanding season in the VFL where he led the league for total marks and contested marks. Should see plenty of action down back for Gold Coast.

Isaac Cumming (GWS Giants) $173,700

Cumming was on the radar at this time last year but managed just two AFL games in 2018 for modest SuperCoach returns. With another pre-season under his belt and senior players including Dylan Shiel, Tom Scully and Ryan Griffen departing, there are spots available in the Giants’ best 22. He averaged just over 20 disposals per game in the NEAFL, including one 33-disposal and two-goal game. Could he be 2019’s Jeremy Finlayson?

Oleg Markov (Richmond) $158,000

The Tigers have big raps on Markov but 2019 is surely a make or break year for him. It will be his fourth season at Richmond and given he’s still yet to cement his spot in the team, he needs a big pre-season to get himself in the mix. With the departures of depth players Sam Lloyd, Reece Conca, Corey Ellis and Anthony Miles, there is opportunity for Markov to put himself under coach Damien Hardwick’s nose. Bachar Houli has been a great servant but will the Tigers look to transition Markov into that role? Watch this space. Provides great dash from defence or on the wing and ignored interest from rivals at the end of the year to re-sign with Richmond. Track watchers have told us he’s put on some serious size.

Isaac Quaynor (Collingwood) $153,300

Collingwood’s first-round draft pick has been likened to Bulldog Jason Johannisen for his speed and ability to take the game on, and many believe he’s ready to step into the senior team should an opportunity arise. With an ASADA drug test hanging over Sam Murray, the Pies do need a small rebounding defender and Quaynor definitely fits the bill. He averaged 419m gained in the under-18 championships, ranked No.2 in the competition and was rated elite for contested possessions. Watch his pre-season form.

Jack Scrimshaw (Hawthorn) $149,800

A former No.7 draft pick, Scrimshaw was traded to Hawthorn from Gold Coast during the trade period after never really getting settled in Queensland. The Hawks have a history of turning players from rival clubs into stars and talent doesn’t disappear overnight, so Scrimshaw could be a diamond in the rough. We know coach Alastair Clarkson has given big roles to younger players in the past two years as he regenerates his list for another tilt at a premiership. Look out for him in the JLT Series to gauge whether he’s in the senior selection mix early.

Callum Wilkie (St Kilda) $124,900

Picked up by the Saints in the rookie draft from SANFL club North Adelaide, where he won the best-and-fairest this year as a playmaking defender. The 22-year-old averaged 26 disposals and nine marks a game and could have an immediate impact.

Jordan Clark (Geelong) $144,300

The Cats haven’t been afraid to throw their draftees into the AFL furnace early and Clark could be one to come in and have an immediate impact. The No.15 draft pick has a lot of upside still, after only recently focusing on footy, but has played against senior bodies in the WAFL already which holds him in good stead for a potential debut. He’s a very creative player who could come in and play across halfback to free up Zach Tuohy.

Chris Burgess (Gold Coast) $123,900 def/fwd

One of the Suns’ three priority mature-age access recruits, along with Sam Collins and forward Josh Corbett. The 22-year-old played as a swingman for West Adelaide this year and has been given dual-position status in SuperCoach. It also doubles his chances of selection after the departure of bookends Tom Lynch and Steven May.

Marty Hore (Melbourne) $117,300

Took the second-most marks in the VFL this year (behind Collins) and gets a chance at the Demons at age 22. He is likely to be a back-up for first-choice backmen Steven May and Jake Lever but the Dees chopped and changed their defence a fair bit last season and Lever has had some hiccups in his return from a knee injury. Ready if called upon.

Jez McLennan (Gold Coast) $117,300

The Suns are expected to give their kids plenty of game time next season and McLennan is one who could be given an opportunity. At 185cm and 81kg, he’s got a pretty solid body already and plays across halfback — a perfect position for a young player finding his way in the game. He reads the ball very well in flight and is known for his intercept marking, an area Gold Coast is lacking down back.

Harrison Wigg (Gold Coast) $102,400

Wigg was on plenty of SuperCoach radars 12 months ago after being traded to the Suns from Adelaide following a big season in the SANFL when he averaged 25 disposals, five tackles and 98 SuperCoach points a game. He never got a chance to show what he can do at AFL level in 2018 after breaking his ankle in an early pre-season training session, but if he’s fit for Round 1 he could be a great bottom-priced bench option.
 

Presto

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MIDFIELDERS

Sam Walsh (Carlton) $207,300

Normally the No.1 draft pick is overlooked as a cash cow option because their price is steep for an untried AFL player, but Walsh is different. Champion Data described him as one of the most “reliable ball-winners ever seen” after averaging 29 disposals across 41 matches and at least 23 disposals in all 25 of his TAC Cup matches as both an under-age and top-age player. He will join Patrick Cripps in the Blues midfield and be given plenty of opportunities. Watch his scores in the JLT Series before locking him into your team but signs out of Carlton are good if you’re willing to invest over $200,000 of your cap in him.

Luke Davies-Uniacke (North Melbourne) $197,500

He was one of the must-have cash cows last season but things didn’t quite go to plan for the No.4 draft pick. Davies-Uniacke was in and out of the North Melbourne side and averaged only 40.4 SuperCoach points per game. With the addition of Jared Polec, Aaron Hall and Dom Tyson, it’s hard to see him playing a big role. Pass.

Bailey Smith (Western Bulldogs) $180,300

At 185cm and 83kg, Smith is ready for senior footy and he’s exactly the type of player the Bulldogs love — he’s a hard runner who is quick, wins plenty of the ball, uses it well and is clean with his hands in contested situations. He has battled a sore Achilles but is expected to be OK by January, which puts him in the frame to impress during the JLT Series. Was ranked behind only Sam Walsh for disposals in the under-18 carnival. Watch this space.

Tarryn Thomas (North Melbourne) $175,800

The talented Tasmanian is exactly the type of X-factor player the Kangaroos are looking for but will he slot straight into their team for Round 1? He can play forward, midfield or down back but with his natural goal sense, he’ll surely get his opportunity inside forward 50, while also pushing up the ground. Unlikely to be a popular choice but that could change with a solid JLT Series campaign.

Harley Bennell (Fremantle) $167,700

We know he’s not a rookie but Benell is rookie priced, so that gets him on this list. If he can get his body right, the Docker would be the cash cow of the year given he has the potential to be an elite player. The only questions are — can he stay fit, and how much does he want it? If he plays in the JLT Series and he’s picked for Round 1, at just $167,700 he is absolutely worth the risk for such a low investment with seriously high scoring potential.

Jye Caldwell (GWS Giants) $162,300

After losing Dylan Shiel, Tom Scully and Ryan Griffen from the midfield, the Giants bolstered their onball brigade with Caldwell at pick No.11 in the draft. He has had some injury troubles but he’s got a strong body already and with good pre-season training and match form, could push himself into the mix for senior selection given there are spots available. He averaged 22 disposals, four clearances and five tackles in his two full TAC Cup games (before injury), which is a great sign.

Jackson Hately (GWS Giants) $148,800

Like Caldwell, Hately will see opportunities for a senior debut early in 2019 and has the added benefit of already having experience against bigger bodies in the SANFL. He averaged 91 SuperCoach points in the SANFL in 2017 and is an elite stoppage player who tackles hard. He can play almost anywhere because of his size, at 189cm and 80kg, and has been compared to West Coast star Elliot Yeo. He’s on the watch list.

Will Setterfield (Carlton) $144,900 mid/fwd

Former No.5 draft pick is a discount price after playing only two senior games due to injuries, but arrives at Carlton from GWS ready to step straight into the starting midfield at age 20. Showed what he is capable of when he averaged 25 disposals, five clearances and almost eight tackles a game in the NEAFL in 2017 before rupturing his ACL in a practice match early this year. Dual-position status makes him close to a must-have.

Liam Stocker (Carlton) $126,300

The Blues pulled off that risky trade with the Crows to secure Stocker, meaning they must see serious potential in him. He’s already strongly built, with a body that appears ready for AFL footy. He’s been touted as a potential replacement for co-captain Sam Docherty across halfback, while he’s also viewed as a long-term partner for Cripps and Walsh in the midfield. Stocker won the Morrish Medal as the best under-18 player in the TAC Cup, which ticks another box. Can see him being given opportunities to ply his trade early for Carlton. He’s definitely one to closely monitor.

Charlie Constable (Geelong) $123,900

Constable pushed hard for a senior debut in 2018 but despite his impressive VFL form didn’t get his opportunity. He finished top-10 in the Cats’ VFL best and fairest after averaging 24 disposals in his 15 matches, with his best a 34-disposal and one-goal game against eventual premiers Box Hill in Round 21. The tall midfielder will definitely be in the mix to play a role for the Cats in 2019 as they look for more midfield and half-forward options. He’s a must-watch during the JLT Series.

Joe Atley (Port Adelaide) $123,900

Another of the 2017 draftees to consider, Atley was close to senior selection for the Power in 2018 but didn’t break through for his debut, meaning he’s still a nice price for us. He did have an injury-interrupted season but proved his ball-winning ability by winning 20 or more disposals in most of his SANFL games, finishing with an average of 21.5 in his 10 games. Definitely one have on your list.

Matthew Ling (Sydney Swans) $123,900 mid/fwd

The second-year Swan has pace to burn and could be ready to add some excitement to a regenerating Sydney team. With Gary Rohan, Dan Hannebery and Nic Newman all departing during the trade period, John Longmire will need his younger players to step up and fill the void and Ling could be one of those. He was restricted to just six NEAFL games in 2018 but with a big pre-season can push himself into the frame for a debut. Sydney’s head of development, John Blakey told the club’s website: “We drafted him for a purpose — for his run and his talent he showed through his under-18s year. We get him back next year probably looking like a first-year player again because he hasn’t played much football at all. We’ll be really pleased to get him on the park.” Good signs.

Corey Wagner (Melbourne) $123,900

The ex-Kangaroo was signed by Melbourne under the new rookie rules — does that mean coach Simon Goodwin has a specific role in mind? The Demons have a history of plucking mature-age players (Bayley Fritsch, Mitch Hannan) and turning them into significant role players. Is Wagner the next cab off the rank?

Brett Bewley (Fremantle) $117,300

Recruited from Williamstown, where he averaged 25 disposals a game in 2018 and led the league for effective long kicks. Has been likened to Tom Scully for his running ability. Ross Lyon had success with mature-age recruit Bailey Banfield last year and seems to have taken a liking to the concept.

Luke Valente (Fremantle) $117,300

The classic draft slider, Valente was tipped as a likely first-round selection on draft night but slipped to pick 32, where he was happily snapped up by the Dockers. The South Australian under-18 captain already has an AFL-ready body was ranked the 10th-best player in the draft by Champion Data and rated elite for intercept possessions and score involvements. Think Tiger Jack Graham.

Rhylee West (Western Bulldogs) $117,300

Calder Cannons coach Ross Smith says the son of Bulldogs champion Scott West is ready to play in his first season. “He’s a very mature 18-year-old,” Smith said of West, who averaged 19 disposals, six tackles and a goal in the TAC Cup this year. Smith likened tough onballer West to another hard nut Jack Viney — it’s worth noting he scored 117 SuperCoach points in his AFL debut.

Will Hayes (Western Bulldogs) $117,300


The Dogs have a long list of new faces so it’s hard to know what their starting 22 will look like but Hayes is ready to play if needed upon after winning Footscray’s best-and-fairest in the VFL this year. The 23-year-old midfielder averaged 26 disposals and 10 contested possessions a game and finished third in the comp for inside-50s.

Nick Hind (St Kilda) $117,300

Hind’s matchwinning multi-bounce run in the VFL semi-final gave Saints fans, and SuperCoach players, a glimpse of what to look forward to as he dashes off the halfback line in 2019. He averaged 22 disposals, four marks and 87 points a game for Essendon’s VFL side and ranked fourth in the comp for score assists.

Tom Atkins (Geelong) $112,900

Is the 23-year-old from the Cats’ VFL team the next mature-age success story off master recruiter Stephen Wells’ production line? Atkins, a tough ball-winner and dual VFL best-and-fairest winner, hopes to follow in the footsteps of Tim Kelly, Sam Menegola and Tom Stewart. Put him on the pre-season watch list to see if he can break into Geelong’s star-studded midfield.
 

Presto

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#9
RUCKS

Zac Clarke (Essendon) $142,600

Essendon desperately needed ruck depth and that gives Clarke another opportunity at AFL level after being delisted by Fremantle at the end of 2017. He’s never been a big SuperCoach scorer, aside from averaging 96.3 back in 2013, but does have a solid record that includes averages of 83.2, 74.0 and 75.9, all of which would be decent cash builders. The question is: How many games will he play? Can he take the No.1 ruck mantle off Tom Bellchambers?

Darcy Fort (Geelong) $117,300

The 205cm giant finally gets a chance at an AFL club six years after playing for the Geelong Falcons in the TAC Cup. Since then he has spent time in the VFL and the SANFL, where he dominated this year for Central District, averaging 123 SuperCoach points a game. The biggest issue for the 25-year-old will be getting a regular game but the Cats never settled on a starting ruckman last season, trying Rhys Stanley, Zac Smith and Ryan Abbott at various stages. Can Fort go past all of them? Keep a close eye on his pre-season.

Jordan Sweet (Western Bulldogs) $102,400

Another mature-age recruit, Sweet gets a chance at the Dogs at age 20 after a great season for North Adelaide in the SANFL. A versatile big man who can also play up forward, he’s a chance to get a game in a side with limited ruck options.

FORWARDS

Shane McAdam (Adelaide) $123,900

The Crows thought enough of the livewire forward to trade Mitch McGovern to Carlton for access to him via AFL rules that allowed the Blues to snare mature-age players before the draft. The nephew of former Saint and Lions star Gilbert McAdam — and cousin of current Blue Sam Petrevski-Seton — stood out for Sturt this year with his tackling pressure, big leap and eye for goal.

Josh Corbett (Gold Coast) $123,900

The third of Gold Coast’s priority mature-age recruits kicked 22 goals for Werribee in the VFL this year before his season was cut short by a nasty eye injury. Before then the North Warrnambool product was averaging almost eight marks a game and was awarded the Fothergill-Round Medal as the VFL’s most promising young talent. Previous winners include Bayley Fritsch, Luke Ryan, Nic Newman and Kane Lambert — names very familiar to SuperCoach players.

Tyson Stengle (Adelaide) $123,900

A clever indigenous goalkicker who didn’t do much wrong in his two seasons on Richmond’s rookie list apart from being fourth or fifth in the queue for a role as a small forward. Kicked 33 goals in 19 games in the VFL and is set to learn under Eddie Betts.

Matt Parker (St Kilda) $117,300

An explosive forward who was digging holes for underground gas pipes to pay the bills while playing in the WAFL this year. Inspired to not give up on his AFL dream by Geelong star and SuperCoach sensation Tim Kelly, Parker kicked 27 goals — and laid 84 tackles — for South Fremantle this year. He was recruited with pick 47 in the national draft and Saints coach Alan Richardson believes his speed and power will suit Marvel Stadium.

Robbie Young (St Kilda) $117,300

The Saints went all-in on ready-to-play state league guns in this year’s draft, with North Adelaide goalkicker Young joining the club via pick 67 in the draft. Likely to push for selection as a high-pressure forward, he wasn’t a big disposal winner this season but can still have a big impact. A six-goal game against Norwood was a season highlight.

Ben Cavarra (Western Bulldogs) $117,300

One of the genuine feel-good stories of the draft after the Dogs called out his name at pick 45. The 22-year-old won a Morrish Medal in the VFL as a midfielder but switched to a small forward role for Werribee in the past two seasons, winning Williamstown’s goalkicking both years. Kicked 34 goals this year but has enough strings to his bow to still average 97 SuperCoach points a game.

Lachlan Schultz (Fremantle) $117,300

Flies west with Williamstown teammate Brett Bewley after joining the Dockers in the fourth round of the draft. The 20-year-old emerged as a classy small forward over the past three years in the VFL with stints in the midfield.

Tom Wilkinson (North Melbourne) $102,400

A small forward plucked from the Southport Sharks after stints with Williamstown and Sandringham (where he won a best-and-fairest) in the VFL. After being overlooked in four drafts, Wilkinson rated elite in the NEAFL in 2018 for goals, accuracy, forward-50 tackles, marks, score assists and contested marks. Can he break into the Kangaroos’ best 22?
 

Presto

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AFL clubs take a punt on state league picks in search of the next Tim Kelly

CHRIS CAVANAGH, Sunday Herald Sun

January 5, 2019 12:30pm

Subscriber only

This time 18 months ago, Tim Kelly was an apprentice electrician who played for South Fremantle in the WAFL in the hunt for a spark to ignite an AFL career.

Brody Mihocek was packing boxes and driving a forklift by day and pulling on the boots at Port Melbourne VFL training at night.

And Liam Ryan was still trying to shake a party-boy tag that scared off AFL clubs as he took hangers and kicked goals for WAFL side Subiaco week-in, week-out.

Last year, Kelly finished second in Geelong’s best-and-fairest and Collingwood’s Mihocek and Eagle Ryan featured on the big stage of the MCG on Grand Final day.

The trio was the latest reminder to AFL recruiters of the immediate impact mature-age recruits can have and followed a long line of success stories including Matthew Priddis, Michael Barlow and Kane Lambert.

“I think that’s a really positive trend in sport,” Williamstown VFL coach and Hawthorn premiership great Andrew Collins says.

“You need to have a really strong squad to be successful at AFL level and Alastair Clarkson talks a lot about that.

“You can’t just have a lot of developing players on a list. It’s really good to have players who are ready-made come into your team and make your team better straight away.

“Mature-age recruiting has also shown that players are coming in with a drive and resilience to make it work. The pathway of these guys has made them more resilient and in many ways also more grateful for their opportunities.”

Through pre-draft concession selections, the national draft and rookie draft, a total of 25 players aged 19 or older were plucked from state leagues and community clubs around the country and listed by AFL sides.

Three of those players came from Williamstown. Midfielder-turned-small-forward Ben Cavarra found a new home at the Western Bulldogs and small forward Lachlan Schultz and onballer Brett Bewley both crossed the country to join Fremantle.

Collins believes Cavarra and Bewley will be putting their hands up for Round 1 selection at their new clubs.

Cavarra — taken at pick 45 in the national draft — is a particularly exciting prospect after he snagged 66 goals across the past two seasons with the Seagulls.

“I expect him to be everything he was for us and I’m sure Luke Beveridge has already seen he’s got great closing speed, phenomenal agility and he’s a great little tackler who’s got a great ability to put on pressure,” Collins says. “I believe he’ll be a better player for the Bulldogs than some of their departing players.”

A pair of players plucked from fellow VFL side Werribee — Sam Collins and Josh Corbett — are also tipped to be in the Round 1 mix with their new side Gold Coast. Both were pre-draft selections.

Collins, a key defender, was delisted by Fremantle at the end of 2017 having played 14 AFL games in two seasons. He then developed his game in the VFL last year to earn another opportunity.

“He had a great year with us, won our best-and-fairest and was in the VFL Team of the Year,” outgoing Werribee coach John Lamont says.

“He’s going to be a great acquisition to their club on and off the field, even as a first-year player.

“It won’t surprise me at all if he’s in the team Round 1, making a really strong contribution to their set-up.”

The Suns also picked up 22-year-old West Adelaide star Chris Burgess through the pre-draft selections. Burgess stands 194cm, can play either end of the ground and is also expected to earn plenty of chances this year.

Another to keep an eye on is Collingwood VFL product Marty Hore, a 22-year-old rebounding defender who was drafted to Melbourne.

And former Hawthorn recruiter Gary Buckenara believes 189cm midfielder Luke Foley might just be the pick of the bunch, having joined West Coast with pick 31 in the national draft after a year with WAFL outfit Sturt.

“He to me probably has just been that little later developer and he could probably play straight away,” Buckenara says.

While Kelly’s debut season for the Cats will be hard to top, the message is to expect a few of the mature-age recruits to make their mark in 2019.

“Most of those out of the WAFL, SANFL, VFL — they’re capable of playing Round 1 if they’re needed,” Buckenara says.

“That’s the idea of the mature age guys, to use them to fill up your depth.”

SIX TO WATCH IN 2019

SAM COLLINS (Gold Coast)

A pre-draft selection by the Suns who shone for Werribee in the VFL last year. The 24-year-old key defender played 14 games over two seasons at Fremantle before being delisted at the end of 2017.

SUPERCOACH: $188,900 (DEF)

BEN CAVARRA (Western Bulldogs)

A Morrish Medal winner in the TAC Cup as a midfielder in his under-18 year who has gone on to morph into the best small forward in the VFL with Williamstown over the past two seasons. Stands just 172cm tall but kicked 66.51 across 2017-18 and was a strong pressure player.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (FWD)

LUKE FOLEY (West Coast)

A 19-year-old midfielder who stands 189cm and has strong endurance. Foley is a fine kick and won a Colts premiership withSubiaco in the WAFL last year. Played for Western Australia in the National Under-18 Championship and averaged 17.3 disposals, 7.7 tackles and 4.7 clearances per game.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (MID)

CHRIS BURGESS (Gold Coast)

A 22-year-old schoolteacher who was picked up by the Suns as a pre-draft selection from West Adelaide. A late bloomer who did not nominate for the draft when he was younger, the 194cm tall developed into a gun swingman in the SANFL who can play at either end of the ground.

SUPERCOACH: $123,900 (DEF/FWD)

MARTY HORE (Melbourne)

A 22-year-old defender who graduated from the Bendigo Pioneers TAC Cup program in 2015 and developed his game with Collingwood’s VFL side. Stands 189cm tall and played 33 VFL games over the past two years in which he led Collingwood in disposals, marks, contested marks and rebound 50s. Also a two-time back pocket in the VFL’s Team of the Year.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (DEF)

BRETT BEWLEY (Fremantle)

Midfielder who is an endurance beast, has a mature body and a booming and accurate left-foot kick. The 23-year-old spent the past five seasons with Williamstown in the VFL, where he was named in the league’s Team of the Year in each of the past two seasons.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (MID)
 

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#12
AFL clubs take a punt on state league picks in search of the next Tim Kelly

CHRIS CAVANAGH, Sunday Herald Sun

January 5, 2019 12:30pm

Subscriber only

This time 18 months ago, Tim Kelly was an apprentice electrician who played for South Fremantle in the WAFL in the hunt for a spark to ignite an AFL career.

Brody Mihocek was packing boxes and driving a forklift by day and pulling on the boots at Port Melbourne VFL training at night.

And Liam Ryan was still trying to shake a party-boy tag that scared off AFL clubs as he took hangers and kicked goals for WAFL side Subiaco week-in, week-out.

Last year, Kelly finished second in Geelong’s best-and-fairest and Collingwood’s Mihocek and Eagle Ryan featured on the big stage of the MCG on Grand Final day.

The trio was the latest reminder to AFL recruiters of the immediate impact mature-age recruits can have and followed a long line of success stories including Matthew Priddis, Michael Barlow and Kane Lambert.

“I think that’s a really positive trend in sport,” Williamstown VFL coach and Hawthorn premiership great Andrew Collins says.

“You need to have a really strong squad to be successful at AFL level and Alastair Clarkson talks a lot about that.

“You can’t just have a lot of developing players on a list. It’s really good to have players who are ready-made come into your team and make your team better straight away.

“Mature-age recruiting has also shown that players are coming in with a drive and resilience to make it work. The pathway of these guys has made them more resilient and in many ways also more grateful for their opportunities.”

Through pre-draft concession selections, the national draft and rookie draft, a total of 25 players aged 19 or older were plucked from state leagues and community clubs around the country and listed by AFL sides.

Three of those players came from Williamstown. Midfielder-turned-small-forward Ben Cavarra found a new home at the Western Bulldogs and small forward Lachlan Schultz and onballer Brett Bewley both crossed the country to join Fremantle.

Collins believes Cavarra and Bewley will be putting their hands up for Round 1 selection at their new clubs.

Cavarra — taken at pick 45 in the national draft — is a particularly exciting prospect after he snagged 66 goals across the past two seasons with the Seagulls.

“I expect him to be everything he was for us and I’m sure Luke Beveridge has already seen he’s got great closing speed, phenomenal agility and he’s a great little tackler who’s got a great ability to put on pressure,” Collins says. “I believe he’ll be a better player for the Bulldogs than some of their departing players.”

A pair of players plucked from fellow VFL side Werribee — Sam Collins and Josh Corbett — are also tipped to be in the Round 1 mix with their new side Gold Coast. Both were pre-draft selections.

Collins, a key defender, was delisted by Fremantle at the end of 2017 having played 14 AFL games in two seasons. He then developed his game in the VFL last year to earn another opportunity.

“He had a great year with us, won our best-and-fairest and was in the VFL Team of the Year,” outgoing Werribee coach John Lamont says.

“He’s going to be a great acquisition to their club on and off the field, even as a first-year player.

“It won’t surprise me at all if he’s in the team Round 1, making a really strong contribution to their set-up.”

The Suns also picked up 22-year-old West Adelaide star Chris Burgess through the pre-draft selections. Burgess stands 194cm, can play either end of the ground and is also expected to earn plenty of chances this year.

Another to keep an eye on is Collingwood VFL product Marty Hore, a 22-year-old rebounding defender who was drafted to Melbourne.

And former Hawthorn recruiter Gary Buckenara believes 189cm midfielder Luke Foley might just be the pick of the bunch, having joined West Coast with pick 31 in the national draft after a year with WAFL outfit Sturt.

“He to me probably has just been that little later developer and he could probably play straight away,” Buckenara says.

While Kelly’s debut season for the Cats will be hard to top, the message is to expect a few of the mature-age recruits to make their mark in 2019.

“Most of those out of the WAFL, SANFL, VFL — they’re capable of playing Round 1 if they’re needed,” Buckenara says.

“That’s the idea of the mature age guys, to use them to fill up your depth.”

SIX TO WATCH IN 2019

SAM COLLINS (Gold Coast)

A pre-draft selection by the Suns who shone for Werribee in the VFL last year. The 24-year-old key defender played 14 games over two seasons at Fremantle before being delisted at the end of 2017.

SUPERCOACH: $188,900 (DEF)

BEN CAVARRA (Western Bulldogs)

A Morrish Medal winner in the TAC Cup as a midfielder in his under-18 year who has gone on to morph into the best small forward in the VFL with Williamstown over the past two seasons. Stands just 172cm tall but kicked 66.51 across 2017-18 and was a strong pressure player.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (FWD)

LUKE FOLEY (West Coast)

A 19-year-old midfielder who stands 189cm and has strong endurance. Foley is a fine kick and won a Colts premiership withSubiaco in the WAFL last year. Played for Western Australia in the National Under-18 Championship and averaged 17.3 disposals, 7.7 tackles and 4.7 clearances per game.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (MID)

CHRIS BURGESS (Gold Coast)

A 22-year-old schoolteacher who was picked up by the Suns as a pre-draft selection from West Adelaide. A late bloomer who did not nominate for the draft when he was younger, the 194cm tall developed into a gun swingman in the SANFL who can play at either end of the ground.

SUPERCOACH: $123,900 (DEF/FWD)

MARTY HORE (Melbourne)

A 22-year-old defender who graduated from the Bendigo Pioneers TAC Cup program in 2015 and developed his game with Collingwood’s VFL side. Stands 189cm tall and played 33 VFL games over the past two years in which he led Collingwood in disposals, marks, contested marks and rebound 50s. Also a two-time back pocket in the VFL’s Team of the Year.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (DEF)

BRETT BEWLEY (Fremantle)

Midfielder who is an endurance beast, has a mature body and a booming and accurate left-foot kick. The 23-year-old spent the past five seasons with Williamstown in the VFL, where he was named in the league’s Team of the Year in each of the past two seasons.

SUPERCOACH: $117,300 (MID)
Thanks Presto! Was looking for this information.

I'm liking Setterfield, Collins, Bewley, Bailey Smith to name a few. I also think Sam Walsh should be considered if we are to believe the hype. Might not generate the most money but could potentially post decent scores and be a good stepping stone. Alternatively pick mid pricer like Miles for that F6 type.

Thoughts?

P.s. I'm so tempted to make a mid pricer team and take a chance as opposed to GnR approach
 

Presto

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#13
Thanks Presto! Was looking for this information.

I'm liking Setterfield, Collins, Bewley, Bailey Smith to name a few. I also think Sam Walsh should be considered if we are to believe the hype. Might not generate the most money but could potentially post decent scores and be a good stepping stone. Alternatively pick mid pricer like Miles for that F6 type.

Thoughts?

P.s. I'm so tempted to make a mid pricer team and take a chance as opposed to GnR approach
At the moment Setterfield, Bewley, Cavarra and Hore are in my team together with Miles (in an almost pure GnR team). Walsh is not because at the moment I chose rookies only as cash cows, at 207k he will need to average 80 to be accetable
 

Presto

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#14
Part 1
The Phantom’s take: Players at new clubs who must be on your 2019 SuperCoach watchlist


The Phantom, The Advertiser

January 9, 2019 8:48am

Subscriber only

From injured stars to up-and-comers looking for opportunity, The Phantom looks back at his traded player guide and analyses the players at new clubs in 2019 who must be on your SuperCoach watchlist.

Nic Newman

(Carlton, $394,100 Def)

2018 — Games: 21, SuperCoach average: 73

Average 2017: 83

SuperCoaches rejoice; Newman has a new home, which should mean more opportunity in 2019.

And, going by the numbers in his short career, it might mean a spike in SuperCoach scoring, too.

In his 28 home-and-away matches, the neat-kicking left-footer scored 80 or more points in 16 of them, with four career SuperCoach tons to his name.

After dominating in the NEAFL, Newman earned a senior debut in Round 2, 2017 and by Round 3, he had passed the 100-point mark for the first time.

Only three weeks later, the 25-year-old tallied 35 disposals — at 82 per cent efficiency — 11 marks, 13 contested possessions and a game-high 151 SuperCoach points.

The last ball magnet coach John Longmire made bide their in the NEAFL was Tom Mitchell.

Just saying.



Tom Lynch

(Richmond, $425,600 Fwd)

2018 — Games: 10, SuperCoach average: 78

Average 2014-2017: 85, 93, 88, 83

Any player who boasts a career-high score of 180 is always SuperCoach relevant.

But when you are a key-forward playing in a team which averaged 47 inside 50s per game — the second lowest in the competition — in 2018 and only one more in 2017, it’s tricky.

Still, Lynch kicked more than 40 goals in four consecutive seasons from 2014 to 2017 and booted 66 goals and a took a league-high 62 contested marks in a standout 2016 campaign.

After stagnating in 2017, the 25-year-old only managed 10 games in his final season on the Gold Coast before a persistent knee injury ended his year after Round 14.

While Lynch posted that career high in Round 2 against the Blues, the star forward failed to score more than 71 in six of the next eight games, recording his lowest season average since 2013.

But 2019 is a different story.

Richmond is flag favourite, despite their preliminary final exit in 2019 and, more importantly, put the ball inside 50 13 more times per game than the Suns last season.

This resulted in the Tigers taking, on average, 13 marks inside 50 per game — the second-most in the competition and five more than the 18th-ranked Gold Coast.

Sure, Richmond’s game isn’t built around dominant tall forwards but there is no doubt Lynch will get his hands on the ball more this year.

Chad Wingard

(Hawthorn, $481,100 Fwd)

2018 — Games: 21, SuperCoach average: 89

Average 2014-2017: 80, 98, 81, 93

While he’s been inconsistent in the past, Wingard is a star.

There is no doubt about it.

At his peak, he was, arguably, Port Adelaide’s second-best player, behind Robbie Gray.

The 25-year-old left-footer is a mercurial forward, booting 232 goals and directly assisting 111 others in 147 games at Alberton.

But he’s also a creative and dangerous midfielder as he’s shown at different stages of his career.

No more so than in the second half of 2018.

After a quiet start to the year, Wingard moved into the midfield in Round 12 and averaged 24 disposals, 12 contested possessions, five clearances, five inside 50s, five tackles and 103 SuperCoach points per game, while also booting 11 goals.

He ranked No. 1 for inside 50s and No. 2 for goal assists at the Power last season.

If Clarkson persists with Wingard further up the ground, he might just develop into the SuperCoach premium he’s threatened to become for so long.

Kade Kolodjashnij

(Melbourne, $363,700 Def)

2018 — Games: 8, SuperCoach average: 67

Average 2014-2017: 68, 89, 69, 72

Kade Kolodjashnij is a bit of a forgotten man.

While twin brother Jake played every game in 2018, cementing his spot in Geelong’s back six, Kade has only managed 19 appearances in the past two seasons after battling concussion issues.

But, after receiving positive news — a weakness in his neck was the primary source of the ongoing issue, rather than the concussion itself — late in the season, Kolodjashnij returned to the senior side in Round 18 and has done enough to convince Melbourne he is right to go.

In 2015, as a 19-year-old in just his second season in the competition, the classy left-footer averaged 22 disposals — 17 effective — and 89 SuperCoach points per game.

Kolodjashnij ranked No. 1 at the Suns for metres gained and No. 12 in the competition for intercept possessions.

The No. 5 selection at the 2013 National Draft struggled with an abdomen issue the following season and is yet to recapture the form of his sophomore year.

But, if he can get a clear run at it in 2019, expect Kolodjashnij, who has been training with the midfield group during the pre-season, to bounce back in a big way in a team that wins plenty of the football.

It might not take him long to remind everyone just how good he can be.

Aaron Hall

(North Melbourne, $389,200 Mid)

2018 — Games: 6, SuperCoach average: 80

Average 2014-2017: 59, 79, 95, 92

The 27-year-old’s offensive power has never been questioned.

It’s what he does without the ball that’s come under the spotlight and it’s the major reason Hall found himself in the reserves on a number of occasions in the past two seasons.

But, with a more sound defensive structure in place, does he have to worry about defending at the Kangaroos?

Of course he has to; team defence is part of the modern game but the playmaking midfielder might get more of a license to thrill at his new home.

And if he does, we could see a return to the form that saw he become a popular SuperCoach name in 2016 and 2017.

Hall started 2016 with a bang, polling three Brownlow Medal votes in each of the first three games after a blistering run of form.

The speedy midfielder averaged 36 disposals, seven marks, six inside 50s and 129 SuperCoach points in the opening three rounds.

He went on to average 5.3 inside 50s — the equal-second highest in the competition — and 19.7 uncontested possessions (equal 7th) per game.

While Hall still sat inside the top 10 for both statistics the following season, an inconsistent year saw his average fall from 95 to 92 in 2017.

Inconsistent is another tag Hall is yet to shake after posting scores of 76, 21, 84, 110, 137 and 50 in his six games in 2018 before suffering a season-ending pectoral injury in Round 12.

Can he become more than a ‘what if’?

Dan Hannebery

(St Kilda, $326,100 Mid)

2018 — Games: 14, SuperCoach average: 60

Average 2014-2017: 101, 114, 113, 97

At this time in 2016, Hannebery had just recorded his second-consecutive SuperCoach season average of 113 or more and earned this third All-Australian jacket in four years.

The midfielder had also tallied more disposals than any other player in the competition at an average of 31.

But at the same time, a collision with Easton Wood in the Grand Final kick started his battle with injury.

Two years later, Hannebery has limped through a season which saw him play just 14 games and fail to win more than 18 disposals in seven of them.

The 27-year-old’s SuperCoach price fell to a staggeringly low $279k by Round 23, 2018.

And, while Hannebery has left the club he thought he would finish his career at, his last game as a Swan resulted in 24 disposals, 10 contested possessions, eight marks and 96 SuperCoach points in the elimination final loss to the Giants.

Is it enough to pick him in 2019?

If he’s fit and enjoys a decent summer at his new home, it’s going to be hard to ignore the left-footer, who will step straight into a midfield crying out for star power.

But with a pre-season hamstring injury prior to Christmas, it remains a big ‘if.’
 

Presto

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#15
Part 2
The Phantom’s take: Players at new clubs who must be on your 2019 SuperCoach watchlist


Dom Tyson

(North Melbourne, $411,000 Mid)

2018 — Games: 14, SuperCoach average: 76

Average 2014-2017: 94, 80, 91, 81

In his first season at Melbourne - after 13 games as a Giant - the 186cm left-footer had an immediate impact, ranking second at his new club for contested possessions, clearances and goals in 2014.

Tyson posted nine SuperCoach tons — four in excess of 120 — and averaged 24 disposals, five marks, five clearances and 94 points per game to finish second in Melbourne’s best and fairest.

Injury halted his progress the following season but in 2016, Tyson was, again, a key contributor on the inside, averaging 25 disposals, 11 contested possessions and four clearances per game.

But as the young midfield stars started to develop around him — Clayton Oliver, Jack Viney and Christian Petracca, in particular — Tyson was slowly pushed to more of an outside midfield role.

By the end of 2018, Tyson was averaging just 8 contested possessions per game, three less than in 2016.

And his scoring dried up, too.

After booting 33.23 in his first three years at the Demons, Tyson has contributed 7.15 in the past two seasons.

It’s been an obvious decline for the once-prolific goal-kicking midfielder.

But with his new club trading for some quality on the outside in Jared Polec and Hall, the 25-year-old should get the opportunity to bolster an on-ball brigade that ranked 18th for clearances in 2018.

Will Setterfield

(Carlton, $144,900 Fwd)

2018 — Games: 0, SuperCoach average: —

Average 2017: 44

Before rupturing his ACL during a pre-season trial against the Swans, the No. 5 selection from the 2016 national draft was a popular SuperCoach season last summer.

And, after a move to Carlton, it’s likely to be a similar story in 2019.

The tall midfielder, who was rated as one of the most complete in his draft year, has only two AFL games to his name after battling injury in his first year at the Giants.

But his debut against the Tigers in Round 18 was an impressive one.

The 190cm Setterfield tallied 12 disposals, six tackles and 63 SuperCoach points, rotating through half-forward and the midfield, on debut.

In that draft year of 2016, Setterfield averaged 121 points in the TAC cup and was the only midfielder in the competition to rate elite for goals, score assists and tackles per game.

Like fellow ex-Giant Matthew Kennedy, Setterfield should get an opportunity in Carlton’s developing midfield next season.

And he’s still rookie price.

Anthony Miles

(Gold Coast, $342,000 Mid)

2018 — Games: 1, SuperCoach average: 90

Average 2014-2017: 100, 97, 90, 71

This move will good for everyone.

Good for Miles, good for the Suns and great for SuperCoaches.

The 26-year-old makes his way to the Gold Coast, where he should, once again, feature in the first-choice midfield, after 71 senior appearances in seven years at Punt Road.

In 51 of those matches, the tough inside-midfielder tallied 20 disposals or more and scored at least 80 SuperCoach points in 46 of them.

While he only played six games in the past two seasons, Miles played 53 out of a possible 54 matches between Round 12, 2014 and Round 21, 2016.

And his numbers rank him as one of Richmond’s best performed midfielders during this time.

In 2015, Miles ranked third at the club for disposals, 2nd for contested possessions, 2nd for tackles and 2nd for inside 50s while also recording 25 more clearances than any other Tiger.

With the arrival of Dion Prestia and the rise of Kane Lambert, Jack Graham and Jack Higgins, in particular, Miles has struggled to command a spot in the midfield in the past two years and his lack of pace has seen him unable to fit in elsewhere.

But he couldn’t have done anymore in the VFL, averaging 29 disposals, eight clearances and 121 SuperCoach points at the level since 2014.

The Suns, who ranked 18th for disposals, 12th for contested possessions and 17th for inside 50s, need ready-made midfielders who can win the ball and get it forward.

And they’ve got one.
 

Presto

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The nine riskiest picks in SuperCoach in 2019

Al Paton, Herald Sun

January 10, 2019 10:27am

Subscriber only

SuperCoach is a game of risk versus reward.

Put simply, you can’t win by playing safe. The question is how big a risk are you prepared to take?

The players listed below could be genius selections who deliver amazing value for their price and set you up for SuperCoach glory. Or they could blow up in your face.

To be honest, the chances of the latter are higher than the former. But that’s what makes them so damn tempting.

Will you be the only person in your league brave enough to pick Libba, Mummy or Rocky? Or all three?

Here’s our take on the nine riskiest picks in SuperCoach in 2019.

Tom Liberatore (Western Bulldogs) $300,400 midfielder

Who can be sure what’s going on with Libba’s body — or in his head?

But one thing we do know is the man who returned to pre-season training with a tattoo of a fruit and nut chocolate bar on his forearm can score points in SuperCoach.

At his best, Liberatore is a ball-winning tackling machine who averaged 107 points a game in 2013 and 110 the year after. His role seemed to change in 2017, spending more time forward before he wrecked his knee in the first game of 2018.

Libba says his knee is now “100 per cent” and he’s back in full training, but what does Luke Beveridge have in mind for the former best-and-fairest winner?

A that price anything that keeps him on the park will be a win.

Harley Bennell (Fremantle) $167,700 midfielder

No, that price isn’t a misprint. Paying under $200,000 for a player who averaged 95-plus four years in a row — including a 102-point average in 2015 — seems insane.

But this is also a guy who has played just two games in the past two seasons as his career was derailed by a series of soft-tissue injuries and off-field drama.

But Ross Lyon has backed him in to repay his faith and Bennell signed a one-year deal in August. His manager Colin Young says Bennell’s calf is “OK” and he knows he is on his last AFL chance.

“Harley knows exactly what he has to do next year to get back to becoming an elite player,” he said on SEN.

“Hopefully he does play the 22 games next year and proves himself again.”

Harley Bennell is on his last chance at Fremantle.

Pearce Hanley (Gold Coast) $296,400 defender

It’s a few years since Hanley was a top SuperCoach pick dashing off half-back for Brisbane.

Since then he has been traded to Gold Coast and has had a terrible run with injuries, with shoulder and hamstring problems ruining his 2018 campaign.

But that price makes us take notice again. If he scores anything north of 50 his price will go up, and it could be a sharp jump if he can put a string of games together like the last four games of 2017 when he produced scores of 119, 100, 87, 105.

The odds of getting 22 games out of him aren’t high but a quick cash grab isn’t out of the question.

Shane Mumford (GWS) $320,200 ruck

Big Mummy retired at the end of 2017 after a decade of bashing and crashing for the Cats, Swans and Giants, with a foot injury the final straw for the popular ruckman.

But after a year out of the game Mumford is back, signing with the Giants under new AFL rookie rules.

He says his body is refreshed after keeping fit working as the GWS ruck coach and starting a boxing career.

He’s likely to play as the Giants’ No.1 ruckman which should mean 80-odd SuperCoach points in the bank on its own, and he has shown an ability in the past to go way bigger. In 2015 he scored 120-plus in four of his 11 games and the year before he went above 150 three times.

The issue is that was a while back, Mumford is now 32 with a battered body and — a huge red flag — he’ll miss the first two rounds through suspension after being filmed snorting cocaine.

But if you can find ruck cover (by, for example, starting Justin Westhoff in your forward line who can switch with a ruck/forward rookie) or wear the losses knowing private leagues don’t start until Round 3, it could be a very brave, and rewarding, move.

Tom Scully (Hawthorn) $334,900 midfielder

Scully caused the biggest surprise of the trade period when he quit the Giants to join Hawthorn.

Opinions are divided about his recovery from a serious ankle injury, with some predicting a successful return and others suggesting he’ll never be the same player who broke GPS monitors and averaged a career-high 97 SuperCoach points a game in 2016.

We remember similar talk when the Hawks recruited Jaeger O’Meara so that provides a template of the potential risks and rewards of picking Scully in SuperCoach.

There is no timeline on Scully’s return although he says “everything’s on track” as he makes a cautious return to pre-season training.

Watch and wait.

Jack Billings (St Kilda) $437,600 forward

Billings has his name etched on the “never again” list of many SuperCoach players — including this author, so bear that in mind when reading a preview of his 2019 prospects.

After averaging 93 points a game in 2017 and scoring 133 in Round 1 last season, Billings suffered a similar fate to his team. He didn’t score another ton until Round 17 including a month in which he didn’t score above 60.

That hardly inspires confidence, but his back end to the season was encouraging (96 average over the past month), the talent that made him a popular pick is still there and — surely — the Saints will be better next year.

Then there is the tantalising prospect of Billings spending more time in the midfield.

On the other side of the equation, that midfield time has been promised for a long time but hasn’t happened and it will be harder to get a role with the arrival of Dan Hannebery. Then there’s his kicking for goal — in the past five years he has never boasted an accuracy of more than 42 per cent.

Then again, he’s $80,000 cheaper than he was at Round 1 last year. Herald Sun reporter Eliza Sewell is prepared to give him another chance. She’s braver than me.

Matthew Kreuzer (Carlton) $432,900 ruck

Looking for a risky ruckman who will play the first two rounds? Kreuzer could be the man.

He had 50 points at quarter-time in Round 1 last season before injuries struck and never really recovered, with a heart scare ending his season at Round 17.

It’s easy to forget he was the No.1 ruckman in SuperCoach in 2017 with a 110-point average, and still registered a 139 and 127 last year.

“The body is good now. All of those issues are fixed,” he told the Blues website last week.

“Training has also been really good – I haven’t missed anything yet. I’m looking forward to getting through to Christmas and then really getting going after that.”

Kreuzer finished with an 80-point average in 2018 but that included several injury-affected games including a 20 in his final appearance against St Kilda, when he played just 8 per cent of the game. That means he is seriously underpriced next season. Pick Kreuzer instead of Max Gawn and you have $260,000 more to spend somewhere else. Tempted?

Tom Rockliff (Port Adelaide) $405,900 midfielder

If Billings had SuperCoach players bashing their head against the wall last season, Rockliff was in a whole other league of frustration.

A scoring machine at Brisbane (he averaged 132 in 2014), he suffered one of the biggest falls in the AFL after switching to Port Adelaide.

Constant battles with injury and an uncertain role at a new club didn’t help, but Rocky just didn’t look like the same player. Even a late-season revival of sorts couldn’t save him from his lowest season average in a decade.

The silver lining? He’ll start 2019 cheaper than at any time in recent memory.

Rockliff is priced at roughly a 75-average which he should score in his sleep if he’s even 90 per cent fit. The midfield bull revealed after the 2018 season that he played most of his first year at the Power with shoulder problems, with his season called off after it popped out of its socket completely against West Coast in Round 21.

Rockliff is now easing his way back into pre-season training after post-season surgery that he hopes will allow him to attack the 2019 season from Round 1.

Will that mean a return to his high-scoring SuperCoach ways? We might wait and see.

Michael Hibberd (Melbourne) $398,700 defender

Another player who endured a frustrating 2018, battling to reach his heights of the previous season.

Hibberd averaged 99 points a game in 2017, which was no fluke after two years of 90-plus averages at the Bombers. Last year that figure plummeted to 73 points a game with his only century coming in the semi-final against Hawthorn (he scored 10 tons in 2018).

What happened? He missed a few games late in the year with a quad injury but seemed to play a similar role running off half-back. One apparent change was his move away from kick-in duties, but he is perfectly suited to new rules that allow all players to run out of the defensive goalsquare without tapping the ball on their boot.

That could mean a lot more points so watch his role closely in the pre-season.
 

Darkie

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#19
I have 4 of the 9 for this year, and had 3 others last year!
 

Presto

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Three players to watch from:

See every player’s SuperCoach price and position from Adelaide, Brisbane, Carlton and Collingwood

Ben Higgins and Gilbert Gardiner, Herald Sun

January 14, 2019 9:22am

Subscriber only

SuperCoach 2019 is almost here.

In the first of four parts, we reveal every player’s price and position from Adelaide, Brisbane, Carlton and Collingwood.

Plus, we look at three players to watch from every club, including the premium must-haves, the cash cows to know and the mid-price risks to avoid.

ADELAIDE

THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH

Brad Crouch ($418,000, Mid)

The injury-prone midfielder is once again on the pre-season watchlist … as he seems to be every year. However, for his talent and ball-winning ability, $418k is too much value to ignore. Fingers crossed he can stay fit.

Brodie Smith ($332,500, Def)

The attacking half-back returned for the last two games of 2018 and pumped out scores of 46 and 129. When on, Smith pumps out 100s with ease and, as such, is amazing value at $332k. A must-watch bargain buy in the pre-season.

Shane McAdam ($123,900, Fwd)

Has all the tricks and then some to figure at senior level, the mature-aged recruit boasts an x-factor around the goals and hunger to hunt opposition. Booted 31 goals in 17 SANFL games last season.

BRISBANE

THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH

Harris Andrews ($480,100, Def)

The key defender had a breakout SuperCoach season in 2018, taking his average from 69 to 88, and it could have been more if not for a horrible head injury. From Round 4 to 12, Andrews averaged 106 and returned to score 91, 96 and 91 in the final three games.

Stefan Martin ($573,700, Ruck)

Looking for a cheaper alternative to Grundy-Gawn? Look no further than the star Lion. Martin is more than $118,000 cheaper than Max Gawn and just as capable of scoring big hundreds. Martin scored 13 hundreds in 2018 with 10 of those 110 points or more.

Lachie Neale ($607,300, Mid)

Ticks all the boxes despite a hefty price tag. Expect Neale to be among the top eight scorers at season’s end, having averaged 111.9 from 22 games last year. The sky’s the limit for the Lions’ marquee signing.

CARLTON

THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH

Sam Walsh ($207,300, Mid)

Big wraps on the No.1 draft pick with Blues young gun Harry McKay already declaring Walsh a star. “If you guys do SuperCoach, I’d get him in early,” McKay said before Christmas. Liam Stocker is a cheaper alternative at $126,400.

Nic Newman ($394,100, Def)

The ex-Swan is one of the pre-season buzz players after Sam Docherty’s season-ending knee injury. Newman was a proven SuperCoach scorer in Sydney and now arrives at Carlton, a team in need of a playmaking half-back.

Will Setterfield ($144,900, Mid-Fwd)

Coming off a knee reconstruction, Setterfield is no certainty to suit up for Round 1 but there is little doubt he will play at some stage in 2019 - barring injury of course. The former No.5 draft pick is a strong inside midfielder in a similar mould to Patty Cripps.

COLLINGWOOD

THREE PLAYERS TO WATCH

Jordan De Goey ($476,400, Fwd)

Only special players win games off their own boots and De Goey is one of them. Absolute beast in the second half of last season only to be derailed by a bout of bone bruising.

Isaac Quaynor ($153,300, Def)

Taken with pick No.13 in the national draft, the Collingwood Next Generation Academy prospect looks ready made, boasting speed and composure by hand and foot. Will surely get his chance early in the season.

Dayne Beams ($557,600, Mid)

What will Beams’ role be in the stacked Magpies midfielder? The ex-Lion will likely be behind Pendlebury, Treloar, Adams and Sidebottom in the pecking order but could be a dangerous high half-forward in a Robbie Gray-type role.
 
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