News Injuries & Suspensions

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Townshend :-

Now we're onto the "bump" as the Tribunal found it to be on Tuesday night.
Cripps' counsel is highly critical of this term.
Townshend says a bump is a "decision", but the Tribunal found both Cripps and Ah Chee had eyes for the football and they both contested the ball. Therefore, no "decision" from Cripps to bump.
"This is where the Tribunal goes on a frolic and journey," Townshend says.


:LOL::LOL::LOL:
 

Darkie

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This is difficult to manage. The AFL has to protect players but players should still be allowed to go for the ball. I didn't see any malice in what Cripps did.
I think the issue arises because they’re focusing too much on the actual impact of an action, and not the expected impact. If they focused on expected impact there wouldn’t be the same tension.
 
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In a strict sense the Cripps decision is right and I'm glad to see a line has been drawn between a player simply going for the ball v a player choosing to bump. As much as I didn't like the result of either the Rioli or Cripps incidents, it is the right call in the context of the current rules and a contact sport involving high impact. When debating culpability for these sort of incidents I often ask the question what would happen if two players both go for the ball and both get knocked out? Or two players of the same team clash heads in a contest and one or both are concussed? No-one is ever reported in those scenarios and yet the incidents are the same.

Unfortunately, this does not solve the issue of concussion. Add to that the fact that the AFL has proven over the journey how horribly conflicted it can be in the administration of the game and is quite adept at tangling itself up in knots facing issues like this and you have a growing .

To be fair, there really is no solution to the issue of concussion in contact sports. Unless you eradicate contact altogether or bring in some sort of offside rule, players are going to get concussed when doing the very thing that is at the heart of our game - get the ball!. However, I fear the AFL will not be able able to leave this one alone and we'll see a big overreaction in coming months / years. In a sense, the Cripps decision goes against the duty of care approach the AFL has been emphasising in recent years and if that becomes the primary consideration, then the nature of the game has to change. I doubt anyone wants that.

Just my two cents
 
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In a strict sense the Cripps decision is right and I'm glad to see a line has been drawn between a player simply going for the ball v a player choosing to bump. As much as I didn't like the result of either the Rioli or Cripps incidents, it is the right call in the context of the current rules and a contact sport involving high impact. When debating culpability for these sort of incidents I often ask the question what would happen if two players both go for the ball and both get knocked out? Or two players of the same team clash heads in a contest and one or both are concussed? No-one is ever reported in those scenarios and yet the incidents are the same.

Unfortunately, this does not solve the issue of concussion. Add to that the fact that the AFL has proven over the journey how horribly conflicted it can be in the administration of the game and is quite adept at tangling itself up in knots facing issues like this and you have a growing .

To be fair, there really is no solution to the issue of concussion in contact sports. Unless you eradicate contact altogether or bring in some sort of offside rule, players are going to get concussed when doing the very thing that is at the heart of our game - get the ball!. However, I fear the AFL will not be able able to leave this one alone and we'll see a big overreaction in coming months / years. In a sense, the Cripps decision goes against the duty of care approach the AFL has been emphasising in recent years and if that becomes the primary consideration, then the nature of the game has to change. I doubt anyone wants that.

Just my two cents
RE:....there really is no solution to the issue of concussion in contact sports.........
;)

NFL uniform.jpg
 
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Chatting to a buddy in the States and he reckons its worse to have a helmet as people use that as a 'weapon'. Certainly concussion issues in the NFL.
Yeah, I know that NFL players get concussed and, as stated below, the worry is that there is little knowledge about concussion.
Also interesting in this article is that, the minor concussions are a problem too and they are not picked up during a game.



NFL Legend Brett Favre Says He Likely Experienced 'Thousands' of Concussions Over His Career
Jason Duaine Hahn - 8h ago

Brett Favre, the former Green Bay Packers quarterback.........was asked how many head injuries he sustained over the course of his career. The 52-year-old NFL Hall of Famer said he initially believed the number was low, but now thinks the estimate is much higher now that he knows more about concussions, which can cause chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

"The thing about concussions is we still don't know a lot about them,"........"If you had asked me this 10 years ago, how many concussions I had, I would have said three."

"The reason I would have said three," he explained, "[is] I thought concussions were where you get knocked out, where you black out, for a period of time you don't know where you are, memory loss, dizzy. A boxer gets knocked and tries to get up, his legs are rubber. That's a concussion."

Favre said he now understands that a concussion can happen without someone becoming unconscious.

"What we now know is concussions happen all the time," he said. "You get tackled and your head hits the turf, you see the flashes of light or ringing in your ears, but you're able to play."

"So, based on that, thousands," Favre continued. "That's what's kind of frightening about the concussion thing. It's the ones that seem minor that do the damage, because you're able to keep going......... "

As defined by the Centers for Disease Control, concussions are traumatic injuries generated by hits to the head or body that cause the brain to bounce around the skull. Football players may experience many concussion-causing blows throughout their careers. Repeated concussions can lead to CTE, which is characterized by long-term effects such as trouble concentrating, memory problems and depression........
 
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