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Rowsus

Statistician
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Melbourne
In mainland USA, the furthest you can be from a McDonalds is 190km. In 2010 it was actually only 170km.
To compare, if you stood on the tip of Cape York, your nearest McDonalds would be 500km away, in Smithfield near Cairns.
All measurements are as the crow flies.
 
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West Coast
In mainland USA, the furthest you can be from a McDonalds is 190km. In 2010 it was actually only 170km.
To compare, if you stood on the tip of Cape York, your nearest McDonalds would be 500km away, in Smithfield near Cairns.
All measurements are as the crow flies.
Given that Maccas are closing all their Russian outlets how far away do you think the nearest Maccas is from Norilsk?
 

Rowsus

Statistician
Joined
19 Mar 2012
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Melbourne
You can jump in your car, and with a full tank of gas, and 5 hours to kill, you can visit each of the cities of:
Copenhagen, London, Dublin, Lisbon, Paris, Vienna, and Seville........ and you travelled less than 400kms!!!!
How did you manage that???!!!

They are all cities in Ontario, Canada!
 
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Bulldogs
The fabella (named after the faba/broad bean) is a small sesamoid bone located in the tendon of a muscle at the back of the knee. It is common in four-legged mammals, but curiously it also occurs in some humans.
Fabella.JPG
Although the fabella seems to have disappeared with the evolution of great apes, it mysteriously reappeared in humans sometime after they diverged from chimpanzees.

In 1918, an average of 11% of human knees, worldwide, had fabellae, with bilateral cases (one/knee) being more common than unilateral ones (one/person). But today, the average prevalence is 39%. With better nourishment people are getting taller and it is postulated that the fabella provides extra stability to the cope with the increased forces in the knee.

In humans, it is more common in men than women, older individuals compared to younger, and there is high regional variation, with fabellae being most common in people living in Asia and Oceania and least common in people living in North America and Africa.

NB. Sesamoid bones (named after sesame seeds) are bones embedded in tendons/muscles.
 
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Collingwood
Dolphins and whales sleep with one eye open.
Dolphins only allow one half of their brains to sleep at a time; the other half stays alert to enable the dolphin to continue breathing and look out for dangers (sharks) in the environment. Dolphins only close one eye when they sleep; the left eye will be closed when the right half of the brain sleeps, and vice versa. This type of sleep is known as unihemispheric sleep as only one brain hemisphere sleeps at a time. Dolphins alternate which half of the brain is sleeping periodically so that they can get the rest they need without ever losing consciousness.
 
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